• Sectors:
  • Power

Client: PECO Energy

PECO is investing more than $30 million to expand an existing electrical substation at 32nd and Master Streets in North Philadelphia. This expansion project will create a new distribution substation on adjacent PECO property to ensure the company can continue to provide energy in a safe, reliable and efficient way, while meeting the projected needs of its customers.

Design of the new distribution substation includes the movement of some existing 230 kV facilities on the site and installation of two new transformers, circuit breakers, a new structure that will house substation switchgear and new aerial and underground cable. This equipment is connected to nearby electrical facilities through underground lines.

HBK Engineering performed detailed engineering, permitting and construction support for the site design of the Proposed Master Distribution Substation which will provide enhanced electrical reliability to the Philadelphia area.  HBK also performed the detailed engineering for three casing pipes crossing an existing active railroad and approximately 2000 feet of underground conduit and manhole systems to connect five new electrical distribution circuits to the substations and PECO’s customers.  The project required topographic surveys, composite utility base map development, geotechnical investigations, vacuum excavation test holes, storm water management design, erosion and sediment design, construction estimates and schedules, permitting with the City of Philadelphia, CSX and Conrail, public relations, bid support and cost control from inception to completion

Fast Facts

  • The site design was required to accommodate the existing site topography, existing surface access and subgrade easements by third parties, and updated storm water regulations.
  • The new underground distribution circuits were required to cross an existing active at-grade railroad to connect to PECO’s existing electrical distribution system.
  • The railroad crossings were accomplished via three 42-inch casing pipes that were up to 140 feet in lengths and 15 feet below grade.